Do Not Interpret the Bible Like Oprah

Do Not Interpret the Bible Like Oprah

The most difficult task of a pastor is not defending the deity of Christ, working out issues of ecclesiology within the church, nor is it articulating the doctrines of grace.  The most challenging role of a pastor is teaching people how to interpret the Bible.  In fact, if people can interpret the Bible properly, it takes care of most of the other issues in the life of the church.  Pastors have classes in biblical hermeneutics (the science of interpretation) in seminary, but the fact is, this study is not reserved for pastors alone.

As you can see in the clip above, Oprah Winfrey recently appeared on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert and they engaged in a brief discussion about the Bible.  They were talking about their favorite Bible verse.  If you listen to Oprah closely, you will hear her make some really big interpretative mistakes.  I want to break down what she said in order to demonstrate her error in biblical interpretation.

  1. First, she quotes Psalm 37:4 without considering the context.
  2. Then, she focused on the word “delight” and said that she really likes the word “delight.”  However, she doesn’t attempt to define it in the Hebrew language in which it was written.
  3. Oprah then made a classic mistake.  After quoting the verse, she said, “Now, what that says to me…”  This is a classic mistake in biblical interpretation.  The Bible is not left open to private interpretations.  Our goal in reading the Bible is to return to what the original author intended.  In this case, what did the Psalmist mean or intend when he wrote Psalm 37:4?
  4. At that point, she moved on to define LORD, the sacred name of God (YHWH).  She said, “LORD has a wide range, what is LORD, compassion, love, forgiveness, kindness.  So you delight yourself in those virtues where the character of the LORD is revealed.”  She simply redefines the name of God and substitutes virtues in God’s place.  There is absolutely no biblical interpretative method that would lead to Oprah’s interpretation.  Not one single Bible scholar would support her answer.  Her answer is based on mysticism and a blatant misuse of the Bible to serve her own desires.
  5. Oprah concluded by suggesting that if you delight yourself in those virtues that she previously quoted, you will receive the desires of your heart.  Another clear mistake is her unbalanced emphasis upon the “desires of your heart.”  She doesn’t consider what the heart is without a proper understanding and relationship to the LORD.  Therefore, what she fails to realize is that the heart is deceitful and wicked.  However, her interpretation of the word “desires” is rooted in health, wealth, and prosperity theology.

In order to avoid the classic mistakes of heretical theology, it’s essential to understand how to approach the Bible and how to read it as God intends.  Below are some helpful tips regarding Bible reading and interpretation.

  • Tip #1 – Interpret the Bible in Context:  What does this mean?  It means that we should read the Bible verse by verse through entire books of the Bible rather than merely cherry picking verses from the middle of a letter and trying to import meaning on a verse that may have a different meaning altogether.  Always avoid the classic mistake – “What does this verse mean to you?”  Honestly, it doesn’t matter what it means to you.  It matters what it meant to the original author.  Suppose you found a letter in your grandparent’s attic after they died.  Suppose it was a letter from your grandfather to your grandmother.  How would you come to the conclusion of what your grandfather intended and desired for your grandmother to know by the letter?  Would you start in the middle?  Would you start at the end?  Would you pick a couple of highlights and create a nice outline and perhaps make it rhyme?  No.  You would start at the top and read the entire letter and consider the vocabulary, tone, and implications as you read.  In that same way, we should read the Bible.
  • Tip #2 – Define Words:  Defining the words will help unpack the meaning of the original author.  It would be helpful to especially define the verbs in the sentence and it shows movement and action in the author’s intent.  We must remember that the Bible wasn’t originally written in English.  We do have really good translations of the Bible in our language, but the Bible was primarily written in Hebrew and Greek originally.  Looking at the original languages and defining the words is a key to understanding the meaning of the text.  You can find great resources at Logos.com or BlueLetterBible.com.
  • Tip #3 – Avoid Eisegesis – The goal in biblical interpretation is to pull out of the text the true meaning of the verse.  This is often called exegesis.  Unfortunately, in many cases, people are guilty of eisegesis which is the practice of importing meaning into a text rather than extracting the meaning from the text through exegesis.  In simple terms – our goal in reading the Bible is to find the meaning in the text and lift it out rather than doing what Oprah did in the clip above.  She imported her own meaning into the Bible which avoids the real meaning and violates the sacredness of God’s Word.
  • Tip #4 – Look for the Single Meaning – Remember, each passage of Scripture found in the Bible has only one single meaning.  It cannot have a meaning for you and a meaning for me.  It has one meaning and it’s our goal to locate the single meaning through proper reading, defining terms, and seeking to understand the text through a proper lens of the original author.  Walter Kaiser said:

Any successful exegete must face the question of intentionality.  We are most confident that the meaning of any given word (and therefore its text and context) will be discretely contained in in a single intention of the author. [1]

  • Tip #5 –  Interpret the Bible as God’s Word – The Bible is a unique book.  It is the Word of God to human beings and it contains a wide array of information.  At the heart of the entire Bible is the redemptive plan of God.  It can be traced from Genesis 3 to Revelation 22.  We must read the Bible with humility and respect.  As we read the Bible, we can consider what God would have us know about Him.  We must also recognize that God’s Word serves as a mirror to reveal the true identity of our depraved human heart.  Steven Lawson, in his sermon titled, “Is the Bible Just Another Book?” said, “I’ve read other books, this book reads me.”
  • Tip #6 – Pray – Before you read and interpret the Bible (and during), it would be a good practice to pray.  We depend upon God to give us wisdom as we read the Bible.  The natural man (and mind) cannot understand the things of God because they are spiritually discerned (1 Cor. 2:14).
  • Tip #7 – Examine Your Interpretation – If the final outcome of your interpretation serves to exalt the fleshly desires of the human heart rather than praise and exalt the character and holiness of God – there is likely a mistake in your interpretation.  For instance, as Oprah was using Psalm 37:4 as a means of getting her fleshly desires met, we must realize, that’s not the aim of that particular verse.  You can also read trusted commentators from church history along with trusted Bible teachers from today to see where your interpretation lines up with their understanding of the verse.  How close are you?  Are you in the same ballpark?  If Charles Spurgeon, John Calvin, Matthew Henry, and Jonathan Edwards from church history are miles apart from your interpretation, there is likely a problem somewhere in how you came to your conclusion.  If trusted Bible teachers such as James Montgomery Boice, John MacArthur, John Piper and others disagree with your position by a long shot, you will likely need to reconsider how you came to your conclusion.

If you sit under good Bible preaching each week in the context of your local church, you will notice that your pastor will seek to move systematically through the Bible in a verse by verse method.  Watch how he approaches the Bible.  Notice how he seeks to define vocabulary.  Notice how he links the context of the passage each week.  In that same way, you can read the Bible in your personal devotion.  Avoid hopping through the Bible without any method to your madness.  Likewise, these same principles will be of great aid in your family worship in your home each week.  

Do not interpret the Bible like Oprah Winfrey.  Just as little boys watch professional baseball players to develop better swings and glove skills, we can learn much by watching good Bible preachers and teachers handle the Word of God.  Avoid the poor examples and learn much from the good examples.


  1. Toward an Exegetical Theology, 2006, 113.

Reading the Bible

Reading the Bible

Last summer, my family and I visited Washington D.C. and had the opportunity to visit the different museums around the historic city.  While I’m quite sure my son enjoyed the visit to the US Bureau of Printing and Engraving more than any other attraction, I enjoyed the visit to the National Archives building where we stood over the Constitution of the United States of America along with the Bill of Rights and other historic documents.

If you want to really pick a fight with people, just talk about amending the Constitution and changing the historical document.  Many people are extremely sensitive about the Constitution and believe in preserving the intent of the founding fathers of our nation.  As I think back to my visit to see these old documents, I was struck by much more than the signatures of John Hancock and former presidents.  I was amazed at the high tech security and security guards positioned next to the casing where the documents are housed in the museum.  Much effort goes into preserving these historic pieces of paper.

When it comes to the historic documents of our nation, we seek to preserve the intention of the authors and signees, but when it comes to the Bible, why are we willing to play “fast and loose” with the biblical text?  For many conservative Christians, they approach the Bible as a book written by God.  However, they don’t pay much attention to the authorial intent of the specific text they’re reading.  What did Paul intend for the church at Galatia?  What about the church at Corinth?  What was his overall goal with the church at Ephesus?  What about young Timothy, why did Paul labor so much near the end of his life to write to Timothy?

The fancy “seminary” word for Bible interpretation is hermeneutics.  The word hermeneutics, in brief, means the science of biblical interpretation.  Most church members in the average evangelical church don’t use the term – hermeneutics, but they do employ specific interpretative methods each time they open their Bible.  You see, it matters how we approach the Bible.

Are we merely cherry picking verses or quotes of Jesus about a selected topic or are we seeking to read the Bible in the broad context through a specific lens?  Are we approaching the Bible in order to change the historic meaning to a more updated meaning that better suits our lifestyle or our culture?  Do we have a right to assign meaning to the Constitution of the United States of America?  The simple answer is – no.  Why do so many people seem to think the Bible is an open book that provides us with revisionist license to change and alter meaning?

When we read Exodus are we connecting the dots to Jesus’ death on the cross and His priestly office as described in Hebrews or do we simply soldier through Exodus as if it’s disconnected history?  Martin Luther rightly stated, “No man understands the Scriptures, unless he be acquainted with the cross.”

When reading the Bible, it’s vital to ask good questions about the text such as:

  • Who wrote this particular book?
  • What was his purpose / goal?
  • How is this single text and the events taking place in this text connected to the history of redemption or the big story of salvation?
  • What difficult words and verses are in this text that make it difficult to understand?  Is there another place in the Bible where these same words are used by the same author?  What about outside the specific author of this text?  When reading the overall context, what does the natural definition of the words seem to mean?
  • What is the single meaning of this text?  Keep in mind, there is only one meaning for the text.

Does this remove the joy of reading the Bible?  I would argue in the opposite direction.  I think it increases joy as you’re able to unpack truth that will come to play in your life.  There is a certain amount of joy in uncovering and discovering truth in the Bible – otherwise there is no end goal or purpose in your Bible reading.

As you hear people (especially during heated political conversations) talk about preserving the intentions of the founding fathers as they’re recorded in the historic documents of our nation, let that be a simple reminder about the necessity to preserve the meaning of the human author in each text of Scripture.  Whatever God wanted to communicate is exactly what the human author wrote.  However, he was not writing as a robot.  God specifically chose and designed each human author so as to write and communicate from a certain perspective, with certain vocabulary, and with a certain personality.  In short, what the human author wrote is what God wrote.  This is the beauty of biblical inspiration.  The goal in biblical interpretation is to unearth the gems of divine truth each time we read the Bible.

The Bible may be old, but it’s relevant.  It may seem outdated, but it’s more relevant than our modern publications – including the morning’s newspaper.  The Bible may seem insufficient to deal with the complexities of a modern culture, but each time we examine the hot topics being debated in the town square or the Supreme Court, they always have a connection to this old book that we call the Bible.  Therefore, how we read it matters.

Thomas Watson once said, “The Scripture is to be its own interpreter, or rather the Spirit speaking in it; nothing can cut the diamond; nothing can interpret Scripture but Scripture.”1


1.  Thomas Watson, A Puritan Golden Treasury, compiled by I.D.E. Thomas, by permission of Banner of Truth, Carlisle, PA. 2000, p. 37.

The Surprising History of Harvard

The Surprising History of Harvard

My family was having a meal with a group of ladies who were visiting from England back in January.  As we discussed life in America, someone brought up the American educational system.  As we talked about the origin of some of the most well known and prestigious universities, a couple of the young ladies had no idea that those institutions were originally founded for the training of ministers of the gospel.

It may come with the jolt of an electric shock that Harvard was originally founded for the training of gospel ministers, but it’s true.  Harvard is the oldest institution of higher education in the United States.  The school was founded in 1636 in Massachusetts and named after the generous preacher, John Harvard, who upon his death in 1638 gave his entire library and half of his estate to the school.  To this very day, his statue on the campus of Harvard is one of the most popular landmarks of the institution’s history.

The founders of Harvard looked forward, like other groups who organize the founding of an institution of higher education.  They looked into the future and drafted a statement that would help set a vision for the school.  The language of this document has the ring of the Puritan age.  The following is taken directly from Harvard’s official admission requirements:

2.  Let every student be plainly instructed, and earnestly pressed to consider well,the main end of his life and studies is, to know God and Jesus Christ which is eternal life, John 17.3. and therefore to lay Christ in the bottom, as the only foundation of all sound knowledge and learning. And seeing the Lord only giveth wisdom, let every one seriously set himself by prayer in secret to seek it of him Prov. 2, 3.

From the beginning, Harvard placed a high priority upon God’s Word.  From the reading of God’s Word to the studying of God’s Word, the Harvard faculty seemed to be committed to standing firm upon the truthfulness and reliability of the Bible.  The following statement from the admission requirement gives a picture into where Harvard once stood upon the importance of God’s Word.  They called it “light” that “giveth understanding to the simple” as they quoted from the Psalms.

3. Every one shall so exercise himself in reading the Scriptures twice a day,that he shall be ready to give such an account of his proficiency therein, both in theoretical observations of the language, and logic, and in practical and spiritual truths, as his tutor shall require, according to his ability; seeing the entrance of the Word giveth light, it giveth understanding to the simple, Psalm. 119. 130.

This document that would be binding upon all students pointed them to God’s Word to know and worship God.  They were committed to training ministers to love God’s truth.  This is evident by the following paragraph:

4. That they eschewing all profanation of God’s name, attributes, word, ordinance, and times of worship, do study with good conscience, carefully to retain God, and the love of his truth in their minds, else let them know, that (notwithstanding their learning) God may give them up to strong delusions, and in the end to a reprobate mind, 2 Thes. 2. 11, 12. Rom. 1. 28.

Today, Harvard has a completely different position regarding God’s Word.  The divinity school still remains in existence, but they also have Harvard College which serves as their main undergraduate educational option.  Within the divinity school, the faculty members instruct from a liberal perspective regarding the trustworthiness of God’s Word.  The present faculty would not hold to the Puritan positions on inerrancy, biblical authority, and sufficiency as did the founders.  Today, many faculty members within the divinity school of Harvard embrace a more ecumenical position of openness and spirituality.  This is far different from where John Harvard and the founding faculty of our nation’s oldest higher educational institution once stood.

Harvard research professor, Dr. Harvey Cox, in his forthcoming book, How To Read The Bible (to be released 4-14-15 from HarperCollins), writes, “I am not satisfied with the ex nihilo interpretation of the creation account, which implies a God who is utterly omnipotent and therefore does not have to struggle against evil as we humans do” (26).  This gives us an idea of why Dr. Cox would reject the verbal plenary inspiration of God’s Word as well.  He employs a “history of interpretation” method of biblical interpretation.  In short, Dr. Cox writes, “it moves us out of the duality of ‘what it originally meant’ verses ‘what it now means’ to what it has meant(128).  According to Professor Cox, this methodology widens our perspective and gives us a better understanding of what the Bible says by listening to others interpret the Bible through their lens and context of life.  I will have more to say on Dr. Cox’s positions when I review his book, but needless to say, his positions are starkly different from the positions of John Harvard.

Harvard has changed.  The faculty has changed.  The student body has changed.  Perhaps this change at Harvard is best depicted by a quick comparison of the school’s motto found on the original Harvard seal verses the present day official seal of Harvard.  Rather than  “Truth (Veritas) for Christ (Christo) and the Church (Ecclesiae),” the new seal simply reads, “Veritas” or truth without any binding or absolute foundation.

The question remains – has the Bible changed?  Rather than standing firmly upon the robust authority of God’s inerrant Word, Harvard has taken a more loose position regarding the Bible.  Although the success and prestige of Harvard continues into our modern era, the original doctrines once taught from the lectern in the classroom have been turned into antiquated documents of Harvard’s history, or perhaps, reference points in Dr. Cox’s “history of interpretation” method of biblical hermeneutics.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Note:  I have been invited to Spain to debate Dr. Harvey Cox regarding the inerrancy and authority of the Bible in October of this year.  I will write more about Dr. Cox’s forthcoming book referenced in this article and the debate in the coming months. 

Butchered Bible – 2 Chronicles 7:14

Butchered Bible – 2 Chronicles 7:14

The “Butchered Bible Verse” series continues today with a very popular verse that is often heard in sermons around July 4th in America.  As we approach the study of Scripture, we must be cautious to rightly handle God’s Word.  As we read, study, apply, and preach the Word, we must always remember that the Bible is God’s Word – not the word of man.  We have no right to mishandle it, misquote it, misinterpret it, or reinterpret it to fit our personal agenda.  We must always avoid the trap of many small group Bible studies that ask, “What does this verse mean to you?”  Instead, we should ask what this verse means to God and what did the original author who wrote under the inspiration of the Spirit of God intend?

Butchered Text

2 Chronicles 7:14 – If my people who are called by my name humble themselves, and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven and will forgive their sin and heal their land.

Explanation of how the text is misused

As we’re getting near the summer, we can expect to hear sermons from preachers who, with good intentions, will cite 2 Chronicles 7:14 or preach an entire message on that single verse while applying it to America.  Most of the time it’s an attempt to demonstrate the need for repentance in our nation.  At times we hear of preachers who use this verse to call out our national position on abortion, and in most recent days, our President’s opinion about homosexual marriage.  As we examine the text, it is abundantly clear that 2 Chronicles 7:14 is not speaking about America – the home of the brave!

Explanation of the text

The wrong application of 2 Chronicles 7:14 is to lift it out of its context and apply it to America or any other single nation.  Anytime we attach a text of Scripture to America, we must be extremely cautious.  Because in that act we are saying this is a reference to God’s promise for America when in reality – it isn’t.  The key is found in two specific places in the text.

1.  The verse begins by a key reference to “my people.”  This is not a reference to all people in America or any other nation, because we know that by that phrase the Chronicler was referencing the people of God – specifically of Israel.

2.  Within that framework, the people of God were under judgment for sin.  This involved pestilence, drought, and exile from their land.  It would be wrong to suggest that America is under judgment, as the children of God, and that God is calling us BACK to Him.  For the most part, America has never known God, so God isn’t calling America to come BACK.  If anything, God is commanding unbelievers in America to repent, but they don’t need a rededication card at the end of a service around July 4th, they need a new heart created by the Spirit of God, paid for by the Son of God, and accomplished by the will of God the Father.

A correct view would be to suggest that in a general sense – if the people of God in America would genuinely seek the face of God and call upon Him, while in a form of genuine repentance, we would see a great revival take place in our land.  However, we can’t be promised that it will solve America’s problems.  The truth is, much of the problems that America faces is due to the unbelievers and their desire to live according to the lust of their flesh and the passions of their heart.  The true church in America is smaller than the unbelieving population.  While a revival is needed in our land, what we truly need is a great awakening of genuine salvation.  The former may lead to the latter, but only by the grace of God.

It is not biblically accurate for preachers to stand in pulpits and claim that 2 Chronicles 7:14 is a promise of a total healing of America.  Even if the true church in America remains faithful, God may still judge America.  We must remember that Americans are not God’s people.  In a large sense, the people of America are the enemies of God.  Just to clarify – so as to not sound like Westboro Baptist – the large population of unbelievers in America are the enemies of God as the Scripture says (James 4:4; Romans 8:7; Ephesians 2:2-3; John 8:44).  The church in America belongs to God, but in all reality, that number is much smaller than we like to believe.

May God be pleased to send a heaven sent revival to His church in America and a glorious awakening of genuine salvation among unbelievers.  Let that be our prayer.  There is nothing wrong with American Christians who are proud to be Americans, but we must remember – the the grace of God is not reserved for America alone.  Patriotic Americans have a right to be proud of our nation and thankful for freedom, but we must remember that being a patriotic American is not the same as possessing faith in Jesus and acceptance of the gospel of Christ.

Butchered Bible – Proverbs 22:6

Butchered Bible – Proverbs 22:6

The series, “Butchered Bible Verses” continues today (Friday) although it’s a Thursday series!  Yesterday was extremely busy and I was unable to post this until today.  As we have discussed throughout this series, the Bible is not open for private interpretations that fit our personal agenda, doctrinal positions, or other practical issues of life.  It is our duty as Christians to read, study, and interpret the Bible in the most accurate way.  This will lead us to discover the single meaning of the text (that God Himself inspired) rather than the multitude of man’s opinions that often surround Bible verses.

Butchered Text

Proverbs 22:6 – Train up a child in the way he should go; even when he is old he will not depart from it.

Explanation of how the text is misused

Often people quote Proverbs 22:6 in two specific ways that are not the intended meaning of this verse.

  1. If parents will raise their children faithfully, as God has directed them, their child will NEVER go astray!
  2. If parents will raise their children faithfully, as God has directed them, their child will COME BACK to the Lord by the time they are old – if they walk astray.

Explanation of the text

This text should be approached within the context.  In order to do that, we must first recognize the genre of literature that Proverbs falls within.  Proverbs is considered to be wisdom literature, and while it is the Word of God (completely inspired of God and inerrant), it should not be approached as a blanket promise!  In other words, Proverbs 22:6 is the way that God intends His people to raise children, and in a general sense, what the text says will be the end result.  As a whole, we can expect these results, but it’s not written as a definite full-proof promise that if parents follow Proverbs 22:6 their children will never rebel against the gospel.

For instance, I have friends and family members who have several children.  They raised all of their children under the care of the gospel in a stable, Christ exalting, covenant keeping family environment.  These families were involved in their church and the parents exemplified a priority of worship and service to God along with healthy God centered relationships. However, I have witnessed these families experience heartbreaking situations as one of their children rebelled against the truth of the gospel in ways that the other children didn’t.  In those situations, how should these parents approach Proverbs 22:6?  Should they cling to it as a promise that their wayward child will repent and obey God?  What happens if the child never repents and dies in a wayward rebellious lifestyle of sin?  Was the Bible not true?

Proverbs 22:6 will always remain true, but it doesn’t mean that exceptions will not occur!  In other words, Proverbs 22:6 was never inspired by God to mean that all Christian parents will always have all Christian children.  It does mean that as a whole – in the majority of the cases – Christian parents will reach their children with the gospel and their children will follow in the ways of righteousness.  It becomes a dangerous thing to promote Proverbs 22:6 as a divine promise and blanket truth without exceptions – because it wasn’t intended for that purpose.

May God give us wisdom to raise our children in a Christ exalting, covenant keeping, God focused home in order that we can lead them to a saving knowledge of King Jesus!  As a parent who often falls short, it is my desire for God to give me discernment and clarity that I need to fulfill Proverbs 22:6!

For the glory of Christ alone,

Pastor Josh Buice

 

 

Allegory vs. Accuracy — Is Allegory a Safe Hermeneutic?

A Christians at some point must make a choice at the fork in the road of Bible interpretation – will they go off down the road of allegory or will they stay focused on what the Bible is actually teaching? Good hermeneutics are essential to learning the Bible. If an individual approaches a text with poor hermeneutics he or she WILL end up in some form of false doctrine.I have found that many people in our present day hold to a form of Bible interpretation known as allegory. Allegory is a form of Bible interpretation where a person reads a text and says, “This is a picture of _______” and then they begin filling in the blanks. The first time a person sits under a preacher who preaches with this type of hermeneutic, it may seem like good solid preaching and the preacher may get many AMENS from the congregation. However, when the Bible student goes further into the text and studies out exactly what the text is saying, it will become abundantly clear that the allegorical pictures from the preacher’s sermon cannot be defended with the Bible!

Church history provides us with many good examples for Christian living and ministry. However, when we view some of the giants of church history, we will also discover that some of these individuals held to a strong allegorical method of interpretation. Augustine – one to whom we all appreciate and respect as a great theologian held to allegorical interpretation. Origen was at one time the most respected scholar in church history; however, his interpretation skills were based primarily upon allegory. It was not until the Reformation that such interpretation was rejected by the likes of Calvin and others. Although the Reformation paved the way for much truth and understanding, it did not completely wipe away the allegorical method of Scripture interpretation.As we have discussed the issue of Freemasonry in Christianity in a previous post – we discovered that the Freemasons we interacted with view Scripture through the lenses of allegory. When I presented solid evidence of why Freemasonry was unbiblical and should be rejected by all Christians, they reversed the Scriptures by applying their own interpretation through allegory. Allegory places in the text things that are not there and it waters down solid truths that happen to be present.  When reading present day books and listening to present day preachers, it does not take long to discover that many writers and preachers still hold to an allegorical hermeneutic. The problem is not just the Freemasons! The problem is found on the bookshelves of our Christian book stores and in the pulpit of many of our churches.

Alan Redpath wrote a book titled, The Making of a Man of God which has some good points for men to consider in their Christian walk. However, if one reads the book, it will not take long before allegory is popping off of the pages left and right. Mr. Redpath’s book is about the life of David – one of my heroes of the Bible. Redpath takes David’s life from the Bible and starts with his early days and outlines his life throughout his struggles with Saul until he becomes King. The book also speaks about the problems David faced while serving as King and the grievous sins that he committed.In chapter two, the stage is set for the battle between David and Goliath. Mr. Redpath suggests that Israel is the present day church, Goliath is Satan, and David is a picture of Christ who comes to defeat the great enemy of God and the Church – Goliath [Satan]. If a preacher were to stand and proclaim this in a sermon, he would undoubetedly receive AMENS and quite possibly great compliments from the congregation at the back door. Some may even say, “Wow, isn’t it amazing how Bro. SO&SO brings out the truths of Scripture for us untrained people to see.” However, if those untrained individuals decide to study that picture of allegory out in detail, they will not find any biblical support in the Old Testament or in the New Testament for the allegorical hermeneutic. Redpath states the following at the beginning of chapter two:

“The Old Testament as you know, is full of pictures of New Testament truth. It is not only a book of history, through it is that, revealing to us the great seed-plots of God’s plan of redemption for the human race; it also illustrates many great truths later developed in the New Testament, setting them before us in a pictorial language so that we may apply them in our hearts and daily lives……………David here is a picture of the Lord Jesus Christ, who overcame Satan at Calvary, and also a picture of every child of God who is being made one with Him through faith and obedience.”

As you see, Mr. Redpath is utilizing a method of allegorical interpretation. The pictures he is imposing on the text seem good and profitable to us as Christians, but the problem with his position is the lack of biblical evidence to make such suggestions concerning the text! We as readers have no authority to impose pictures on the text that the Bible never intended.Before confusion sets in among those who may read this post, I am not removing any opportunity for some event in the Old Testament to be a picture or type of something or someone of the New Testament. For instance, when Christ prophesied of His death, burial, and resurrection in Matthew 12 – He used an Old Testament event as a picture!

Matthew 12:38-41 – Then some of the scribes and Pharisees answered him, saying, “Teacher, we wish to see a sign from you.” [39] But he answered them, “An evil and adulterous generation seeks for a sign, but no sign will be given to it except the sign of the prophet Jonah. [40] For just as Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of the great fish, so will the Son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth. [41] The men of Nineveh will rise up at the judgment with this generation and condemn it, for they repented at the preaching of Jonah, and behold, something greater than Jonah is here. [42] The queen of the South will rise up at the judgment with this generation and condemn it, for she came from the ends of the earth to hear the wisdom of Solomon, and behold, something greater than Solomon is here.

Therefore, it would be a good practice to leave out any typology and allegory unless solid biblical evidence exists to back up the pictorial language suggestion. Allegory denies the sufficiency of Scripture at its core and it denigrates the truth of the text! Therefore, it is my conclusion that we should deny the allegorical hermeneutic and cling to a clear and solid exposition of the text. The text is sufficient and it is powerful enough without us adding to or seeking to spiritualize a narrative, historical event, or prophecy of the Scriptures. May we seek to honor God with our study and preaching of His Word! When we read 1 and 2 Samuel, we can view the life of King David with much to learn about history and much to learn about the Christian life. However, if we start imposing pictures on the text that do not exist, we become guilty of perverting the central truth of Holy Scripture.