What Bible translation is the most reliable?  This is a common question that I receive as a pastor and I believe that James White does a good job of explaining the issues—especially regarding the deficiencies of the King James version.

Your Bible Is Not Boring — “From beginning to end, God tells us and shows us that his ultimate goal in all he does is to communicate his glory for the world to see and for his people to admire and enjoy and praise.”

If I Have Enough Faith, Will God Heal Me? — “We should pray for ourselves and our suffering loved ones, not simply try to pray away suffering. “God, please heal this cancer” is appropriate. “God, please use for your glory this cancer, so long as I have it” is equally appropriate.”

$5 Friday: Creation, Grace, & Calvinism — Some good book options on Ligonier’s $5 book Friday special.

Can We Be Legalistic About Not Being Legalists? — John Piper provides some very helpful words regarding the anti-legalist movement that at times turns into antinomianism.

The 4 Biblical Marks of Corporate Worship — Jason Allen writes, “When it comes to the regulative principle, I am not legalistic. I still facilitate an offering, greet visitors, and make announcements. But a broad recovery and commitment to these four elements might revive our services. Let’s be intentional about our worship services and privilege these four biblical aspects of worship.”

Why You Will Join the Wrong Church — “Joining a church, like seeking a spouse, is daunting. Loving others makes us vulnerable and committing ourselves to a church immerses us in the needs of other sinners. Eventually, every congregation will find a way to get under our skin, frustrate us, or even wound us—and we will do the same to them.”

Nobody Respects a Blogger — Tim explains why “everyone respects journalists and authors and columnists, but no one respects a blogger.”

Theology Word of the Week:  Proclaim

γνωρίζω fut. γνωρίσω (γνωριῶ [POxy 1024, 18; LXX; Just., D. 14, 8] Col 4:9 v.l. [Tdf. S. Vog.]); 1 aor. ἐγνώρισα. Mid.: ἐγνωρισάμην. Pass.: 1 fut. γνωρισθήσομαι; 1 aor. ἐγνωρίσθην; pf. 3 sg. ἐγνώρισται 2 Esdr 7:24 (Aeschyl. et al.; pap, LXX, pseudepigr., Philo, Joseph.; Ar. 12, 6; Just., Ath. 3, 1)

① to cause information to become known: make known, reveal (Aeschyl., Prom. 487; Diod S 1, 6, 2; 1, 9, 2; 10, 3, 1; Plut., Fab. Max. 186 [21, 3]; Cato Maj. 336 [1, 2] al.; LXX; TestJob 41:5; Jos., Ant. 8, 102) γ. τι Ro 9:22f; Eph 6:19; τί τινι Lk 2:15; Hs 9, 5, 4; ways of life Ac 2:28 (Ps 15:11); sins Hv 2, 1, 2; words 2, 2, 3f; the past and the future B 1:7; cp. 5:3. πάντα Eph 6:21; Col 4:7, 9; J 15:15; cp. Hs 9, 5, 4; name 17:26.—2 Cor 8:1; 2 Pt 1:16. Pass. Eph 3:5, 10; Hv 2, 4, 2. τινὶ τὸ μυστήριον Eph 1:9; pass. 3:3. περί τινος Lk 2:17. W. ὅτι foll. 1 Cor 12:3; τινί τι, ὅτι Gal 1:11. W. indir. quest. foll. Col 1:27; Hv 4, 3, 1; m 8:2; Hs 2:5; 8, 3, 1. W. attraction of the relat. D 9:2f; 10:2. Abs. Hm 12, 1, 3. Pass. γνωριζέσθω πρὸς τ. θεόν let (your requests) be made known to God Phil 4:6. γνωρίζεσθαι εἰς πάντα τὰ ἔθνη be made known among all the nations Ro 16:26. Reflexive ἐγνωρίσθη Ἰωσὴφ τοῖς ἀδελφοῖς J. made himself known to his brothers Ac 7:13 v.l. (ἀνεγν. N., as in Gen 45:1; cp. Ruth 3:3).—In 1 Cor 15:1, where apparently the discussion deals with someth. already known, γ. is nevertheless correctly used because of the instruction, which evidently introduces someth. new.

② to have information or be knowledgeable about someth., know (Dio Chrys. 4, 33; Plut., Coriol. 224 [23, 4]; Herodian 2, 1, 10; Achilles Tat. 7, 14, 1 and 3; Herm. Wr. 10, 15; POxy 705, 39; 1024, 18; 1643, 8. Λόγος τέλειος: PGM 3, 602ff; Pr 3:6; 15:10; Job 4:16 Sym. ἐγνώρισα=LXX ἐπέγνων; TestAbr A 6 p. 83, 4 [Stone p. 14]; 8 p. 86, 9 [Stone p. 20]; Philo, De Jos. 165, Conf. Ling. 183; Jos., Ant. 2, 97, Vi. 420; Just., D. 3, 2 γνωρίζεις με al.; 80, 2 ‘share a point of view’; Ath. 3:1 ‘note, recognize’ of animals) w. indir. question foll.: τί αἱρήσομαι οὐ γ. which I shall choose I do not know Phil 1:22. Abs. (w. ἰδεῖν) Dg 8:5.—DELG s.v. γιγνώσκω p. 225. M-M. TW. [1]


  1. William Arndt, Frederick W. Danker, and Walter Bauer, A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000), 819.
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