The doctrine of limited atonement is perhaps the most controversial point of Reformed Theology.  I have personally struggled with this doctrine in my life as a Christian, in fact, once upon a time I would argue with anyone over this doctrine because I believed it was an error.  I have been helped by men like R.C. Sproul, and the video below is a good attempt to explain the doctrine that is often the center of debate.

Sola Scriptura Examined and Defended, Episode Two – James White’s second episode devoted to the subject of Sola Scriptura.  It’s worth your time and consideration.

Donald Trump, Paula White Pray For Hedge Of Protection Along Southern US Border – Yes, this is one more reason why you should read Babylon Bee.

3 Reasons Not to Panic over Bible Translation Revisions – Is it wrong to allow modern English Bible translations to be updated over time as language changes?  As we consider the wooden phrases of the KJV, we can see that this is necessary at times.

 Tim Tebow started his professional baseball career off with a bang Wednesday, hitting the first pitch in his first at bat – Tim Tebow shows his athletic ability as he hits a home run in his first time at the plate.  What a way to begin his journey in baseball.

Transgenderism, Outdoor School Policies, and How Christian Families Might Respond – “A parent who attended a recent outdoor school meeting for teachers wrote, ‘Bottom line, ODS can’t and won’t assure teachers and parents that a sixth grade student will not be in a cabin with a high school student [cabin leader] of the opposite gender.’”

$5 Friday: Apologetics, Prayer, & Election – Don’t miss good books each Friday at Ligonier.

How to Pray a Psalm – Justin Taylor provides some helpful words regarding praying through a psalm.

Theology Word of the Week:  Baptism of the Holy Spirit

The New Testament proclaims the gift of the personal Holy Spirit to indwell all believers (Acts 2:18; Rom. 8:9; Gal. 3:2) as the seal, guarantee, means and firstfruits (Rom. 8:23; 2 Cor. 1:22; Eph. 1:13–14) of their eternal life of fellowship with the Father and the Son (Jn. 17:3; 1 Jn. 1:3). The Spirit, now revealed as a distinct agent who speaks, shows, witnesses, helps, intercedes, and can be grieved and lied to (Jn. 16:13–15; Rom. 8:16, 26; Eph. 4:30; Acts 5:3), mediates the presence of Christ (Jn. 14:16–18; Eph. 3:16–17), unites us to him (Eph. 4:3–4), regenerates (Jn. 3:5, 8; 2 Cor. 3:6; Tit. 3:5), illuminates (1 Cor. 2:13–16; Eph. 1:17), and transforms us (2 Cor. 3:18; Gal. 5:22–23), testifies to our adoption, thus altering our self-knowledge (Rom. 8:16), sustains our praying (Gal. 4:6; Eph. 6:18; Jude 20), and gives to us all gifts for service (1 Cor. 12:4–11). His full new-covenant ministry, which presupposed Jesus’ return to glory (Jn. 7:39, cf. 17:5; 20:22 is an acted prophecy), began at Pentecost (Acts 2), according to Jesus’ pre-ascension promise of Spirit-baptism (Acts 1:5; 11:16) in fulfillment of John’s prediction that the coming Lord would baptize with the Holy Spirit (Mk. 1:8; Mt. 3:11; Lk. 3:16; Jn. 1:33). Acts embodies expectations that the gift of the Spirit, signalized apparently by charismatic manifestations, would accompany the water-baptism of adult believers (2:38, etc.), and views non-accompaniment as anomalous (8:14–17, 19:1–6). The baptism-image shows that the gift is to be viewed as initiatory, one element in the total process whereby sinners consciously become new creatures in Christ, accepted and alive as limbs in his body (so when Paul uses the image, 1 Cor. 12:13); the Pentecost story shows the gift as animating, transforming, emboldening, and bringing ability and usefulness in ministry

  1. Sinclair B. Ferguson and J.I. Packer, New Dictionary of Theology (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2000), 73.