I‘m currently reading Kevin DeYoung’s book A Hole in our Holiness with a group of men.  We meet every other week to discuss the chapters over coffee.  In the first chapter, Kevin DeYoung (besides showing his disapproval for camping) points to an often overlooked relationship between our pursuit of holiness and the Great Commission.  If we are majoring on making disciples within our church without a goal of holiness, it’s not really the Great Commission – right?

The Commission of Jesus

Jesus said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age” (Matt. 28:18-20).  What a vast charge to God’s people.  We are to go and reach the world with the gospel.

While we live in a sophisticated culture in 2016, we must not overlook that a great number of people on planet Earth still live in extremely poor conditions without running water, without Internet, without smart phones, without many of the luxuries that we enjoy.  One critical thing that a vast number of the world’s population lives without is the good news of Jesus Christ.  We are commanded to go and tell and disciple these people in the gospel.  That is the heartbeat of the church and it should be the heartbeat of God’s people.  But, as we consider what it means to be a Great Commission church or a Great Commission Christian, we should look well beyond the waters of the baptistry and see the whole picture of a redeemed sinners serving, worshipping, and living for Christ.

The Goal of Holiness

The ultimate goal of Jesus’ command to His disciples was far more than just sparing His elect from the eternal flames of hell.  It had a purpose and that purpose is centered in holiness.  Far from baptism statistics, Jesus was focused on His people and how they reflect the glory of God to all peoples across the world.  When we as believers become competitive and focused on getting high baptism statistics, we miss the point of the Great Commission.

From the very beginning, God has purposed to select His people from the population of humanity and His desire has been for them to be a set apart people – distinct – and holy unto Him.  That doesn’t mean that God expects His people to be peculiar in the sense of odd or strange.  God expects His people to be sanctified.  What does this sanctified life look like?  The entire book of 1 John explains that God’s people love God rather than the world.  Great Commission Christians go and reach people with a goal that extends far beyond the baptistry.  It has a goal of holiness.  J. C. Ryle provides a helpful reminder:

We must be holy, because this is one grand end and purpose for which Christ came into the world. . . . Jesus is a complete Saviour.  He does not merely take away the guilt of a believer’s sin, he does more—he breaks its power (1 Pet. 1:2; Rom. 8:29; Eph. 1:4; 2 Tim. 1:9; Heb. 12:10). [1]


  1. J. C. Ryle, Holiness: Its Nature, Hindrances, Difficulties, and Roots (Moscow, ID: Charles Nolan, 2011), 49.