Many people claim that John Calvin was against missions and that those who call themselves Calvinists or ascribe to the 5-points of Calvinism are anti-missional in their thinking.  Is that true?  Does the belief in a robust God who saves spiritually dead sinners create cold hearts who resist any work of gospel missions among the neighborhoods and the nations?

Over the past several years, the population of men and women who embrace the doctrines often called Calvinism has drastically increased within the evangelical church—notably so within the Southern Baptist Convention.  This has caused many to question their beliefs, examine their positions, and in some cases, to take up the sword and fight.  The common charge is that anyone who’s a Calvinist is also a hyper-Calvinist—someone who opposes the spread of the gospel.  First of all, there must be a distinction between Calvinism and hyper-Calvinism (just as there must be a distinction between the First Baptist Church in your local community and Westboro Baptist Church in Kansas).  Calvinism is not hyper-Calvinism and before we label someone a heretic, we must understand that vocabulary choices matter.

John Calvin’s Missionary Zeal

Did John Calvin teach people to hide the gospel under a basket (Matt. 5:14-16)?  The very moment that you stop listening to horrible sermons, inaccurate lectures in Bible college and seminary settings, and stop reading historically and intellectually dishonest blogs in the Internet, you will actually discover something rather refreshing about this often hated figure from church history.  John Calvin was not only a man with a passion for preaching the Bible, he was also a zealous hearted, missions focused preacher.

As Calvin’s preaching thundered from his pulpit in Geneva, he was preparing men to go and lead churches in France.  He organized, trained, developed, and sent out hundreds of these zealous hearted missionaries who proclaimed the good news of the gospel.  These missionaries stood upon the firm foundation of a robust sovereign grace.  As these men were convinced of God’s sovereignty in salvation, such knowledge became the fuel in the furnace of their hearts as they went out to plant churches and preach the gospel.  By 1562, Calvin (with the aid of other surrounding cities) had planted over 2,000 churches in France.  Some of the missionaries who were sent out from Calvin’s church died as martyrs.  Does this sound like a hyper-Calvinist to you?

The hyper-Calvinist rejects any effort to proclaim the gospel to the non-elect.  Rather than preaching the gospel indiscriminately and allowing God to bring sinners to faith, the hyper-Calvinist resists any attempt to offer the gospel to those who aren’t the elect of God.  Does this sound like the ministry of John Calvin?  Edward Panosian writes the following:

From that city [Geneva], hundreds of missionaries, evangelists, and pastors traveled to all corners of the continent preaching the gospel.  Their efforts, sometimes sealed with a martyr’s blood but always crowned with success, thrilled Calvin. [1]

Harry R. Leader points out that “Calvin’s beloved France, through his ministry, was invaded by more than thirteen hundred Geneva-trained missionaries.” [2]  Why would someone who rejected the idea that we need to send out missionaries to preach the gospel actually send out hundreds of trained missionaries to preach the gospel?

I’ve read about (never met an actual hyper-Calvinist other than the Westboro group) people who were hyper-Calvinistic in their theology, and they would never send missionaries out to spread the good news of Christ.  They would consider it a waste of time and effort.  One such figure from church history was named John Ryland, and he rebuked William Carey for inquiring about “using means” to reach unbelievers (it should be noted that it was William Carey, the Calvinist, who was trying to organize a missions effort).

The Missions Preaching of John Calvin

No hyper-Calvinist would preach with a missionary zeal as was consistently evident in the preaching ministry of Calvin.  In a sermon titled, “The Call to Witness” Calvin preached from 2 Timothy 1:8-9.  He made this powerful statement:

If the gospel be not preached, Jesus Christ is, as it were, buried. Therefore, let us stand as witnesses, and do him this honor, when we see all the world so far out of the way; and remain steadfast in this wholesome doctrine. . . . Let us here observe that St. Paul condemns our unthankfulness, if we be so unfaithful to God, as not to bear witness of his gospel; seeing he hath called us to it.

The preaching ministry of a hyper-Calvinist is cold, lifeless, and without passion for the lost world.  That doesn’t describe the preaching of John Calvin.  For instance, in a sermon on Isaiah 12:5, he said the following:

[Isaiah] shows that it is our duty to proclaim the goodness of God to every nation. While we exhort and encourage others, we must not at the same time sit down in indolence, but it is proper that we set an example before others; for nothing can be more absurd than to see lazy and slothful men who are exciting other men to praise God.

John Calvin was not only a faithful expositor of God’s Word and a defender of the true faith, he was also a zealous proclaimer of the faith.  He preached with trumpet zeal and passionately pointed people to Jesus Christ.  In a letter to five missionaries who had been arrested and were facing death, John Calvin wrote a letter to them on May 15th, 1553.  Here is what he said:

Since it pleases him [i.e. God] to employ you to the death in maintaining his quarrel [with the world], he will strengthen your hands in the fight, and will not suffer a single drop of your blood to be spent in vain. And though the fruit may not all at once appear, yet in time it shall spring up more abundantly than we can express. But as he hath vouchsafed you this privilege, that your bonds have been renowned, and that the noise of them has been everywhere spread abroad, it must needs be, in despite of Satan, that your death should resound far more powerfully, so that the name of our Lord be magnified thereby. For my part, I have no doubt, if it please this kind Father to take you unto himself, that he has preserved you hitherto, in order that your long-continued imprisonment might serve as a preparation for the better awakening of those whom be has determined to edify by your end. For let enemies do their utmost, they never shall be able to bury out of sight that light which God has made to shine in you, in order to be contemplated from afar. [3]

Hyper-Calvinists are heretics who oppose the open preaching of the gospel and never engage in missions.  Whatever your opinion of John Calvin is, let’s be sure to make this clear point—he was no hyper-Calvinist.  The towering figure of Geneva who labored in his expository preaching, trained missionaries, and prepared them to die well—was no heretic.  We must be careful to learn church history from accurate records and to use vocabulary carefully.

If the missionary preaching of John Calvin’s ministry is what it means to be a Calvinist, may the Lord raise up many more.


  1. Edward Panosian, “John Calvin: The Theologian” in Faith of Our Fathers, ed. James Cardinal Gibbons, (New York: Aeterna Press, 2015), 109.
  2. Harry R. Leader, “The Churchman of the Reformation” in John Calvin: A Heart for Doctrine and Doxology, ed. Burk Parsons, (Lake Mary, FL: Reformation Trust, 2008), 68.
  3. Letter 318 [in Jules Bonnet, ed., Letters of John Calvin, tr. Mr. Constable (1858 ed.; repr. New York: Lenox Hill Pub. & Dist. Co., 1972), II, 406].
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