On October 31st, 1517, Martin Luther sparked the Reformation as he stood up against the massive Catholic Church, the Pope, and the selling of indulgences.  When he nailed the 95 Theses to the castle door, he truly didn’t expect the explosive results that took place.  What happened was God’s plan and to God we give all glory!

Below you will see some quotes by Martin Luther and statements about his life, ministry, and impact he had on the world with the gospel.

A Mighty Fortress – Hymn by: Martin Luther

A mighty fortress is our God, a bulwark never failing;
Our helper He, amid the flood of mortal ills prevailing:
For still our ancient foe doth seek to work us woe;
His craft and power are great, and, armed with cruel hate,
On earth is not his equal.

Did we in our own strength confide, our striving would be losing;
Were not the right Man on our side, the Man of God’s own choosing:
Dost ask who that may be? Christ Jesus, it is He;
Lord Sabaoth, His Name, from age to age the same,
And He must win the battle.

And though this world, with devils filled, should threaten to undo us,
We will not fear, for God hath willed His truth to triumph through us:
The Prince of Darkness grim, we tremble not for him;
His rage we can endure, for lo, his doom is sure,
One little word shall fell him.

That word above all earthly powers, no thanks to them, abideth;
The Spirit and the gifts are ours through Him Who with us sideth:
Let goods and kindred go, this mortal life also;
The body they may kill: God’s truth abideth still,
His kingdom is forever.

Statement by Dr. Don Whitney:

During the Protestant Reformation of the 1500s, Martin Luther articulated a timeless distinction between two approaches to knowing God.  He labeled one a “theology of glory,” and applied it to those who believe they can attain to a glorious knowledge of God by human goodness, religious effort, mystical experiences, or the wisdom of human reason.  According to this view, God manifests Himself most often through blessings, victory, success, miracles, power, and other exhilarating experiences of “glory.”  By contrast, Luther argued that the biblical way to know God goes through a “theology of the cross.”  God has “hidden” Himself where human wisdom would not expect to find Him, that is, in the lowliness and suffering of the man Jesus Christ, and especially in His humiliating death on a Roman cross.  As Luther put it, “true theology and recognition of God are in the crucified Christ.”  So rather than finding God by ascending to Him through our efforts, wisdom, or self-initiated experiences, God has descended to us in Jesus whose glory was in the least-expected of places – the cross – and in a way where He can be found by faith alone.

Source:  “Take Up Your Cross Daily,” www.BiblicalSpirituality.org. Used by Permission.

John Piper describes the work ethic of Martin Luther:

Luther was not the pastor of the town church. His friend, Johannes Bugenhagen was from 1521 to 1558. But Luther shared the preaching virtually every week he was in town. He preached because the people of the town wanted to hear him and because he and his contemporaries understood his doctorate in theology to be a call to teach the word of God to the whole church. So Luther would often preach twice on Sunday and once during the week. Walther von Loewenich said in his biography, “Luther was one of the greatest preachers in the history of Christendom … Between 1510 and 1546 Luther preached approximately 3,000 sermons. Frequently he preached several times a week, often two or more times a day” (see note 24).

For example, in 1522 he preached 117 sermons in Wittenberg and 137 sermons the next year. In 1528 he preached almost 200 times, and from 1529 we have 121 sermons. So the average in those four years was one sermon every two-and-a-half days. As Fred Meuser says in his book on Luther’s preaching, “Never a weekend off—he knows all about that. Never even a weekday off.

Source:  Martin Luther: Lessons from His Life and Labor – Desiring God

May God raise up more men like Martin Luther – men who are more dazzled by the treasure of Jesus than with anything this world has to offer.

Pastor Josh Buice