The last words we have on record of the apostle Paul before he was martyred for his faith in Christ was penned to a young pastor named Timothy.  His goal was to encourage him in the work of ministry and to charge him to remain steadfast in the faith.  In order to do so, Paul made a very important statement in 2 Timothy 3:14-15:

But as for you, continue in what you have learned and have firmly believed, knowing from whom you learned it [15] and how from childhood you have been acquainted with the sacred writings, which are able to make you wise for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus.

Timothy was encouraged to remember his journey in the faith and how he was discipled in the sacred Scriptures.  Interestingly enough, it wasn’t a Sunday school teacher, a youth pastor, or a cool YouTube personality that was responsible for the spiritual formation of young Timothy.  According to the Scriptures, it was Timothy’s own mother and grandmother (see 2 Tim. 1:5).

One of the great needs of the evangelical church today is godly parents who take parenting seriously.  While pastors are extremely vital to the maturity of an individual family and fathers are responsible for leading, children need to be impacted spiritually by faithful mothers who recognize their calling and take it seriously.  In the opening words to the first chapter of his book titled, Parenting: 14 Gospel Principles That Can Radically Change Your Family, Paul David Tripp writes, “Nothing is more important in your life than being one of God’s tools to form a human soul.” [1]

Today’s young mothers need to know that spiritual nourishment is vitally important in the lives of their children.  All Christian mothers need to hear these words, “Mom—you are a theologian.”  It’s not that you should be theologically savvy or competent in the world of church history.  All Christian mothers and grandmothers are theologians.  Consider the fact that:

  • Your classroom is your home.
  • Your textbook is the Word of God (the Bible).
  • Your students are your children.

Timothy had been taught and personally discipled by Paul, but it was this great battle-scared preacher who gave the credit to Timothy’s mother and grandmother.  It should be further noted that they were not just placing Timothy in a room with Veggie Tales on a television screen and expecting it all to work itself out.  They were actively taking Timothy to the sacred Scriptures.

There are many things we could insist are needed in today’s evangelical church culture, but at the top of the list would be faithful mother-theologians who understand their God-given role in the lives of their children.  It doesn’t matter if you don’t have a formal education and you may not have authored a book or a blog, but if you’re a mother—you’re a theologian.  You must recognize God’s calling on your life and seek to be found faithful.

If you look at church history, you see John and Charles Wesley pointing to their mother as a major influence upon their spiritual formation.  Charles Spurgeon talked about his mother’s Sunday “sermon” at the supper table.  It was the mothers in Timothy’s life that shaped him in the gospel.  Mom and grandmother, please don’t overlook your role.  Don’t walk away from your post.  Your children need to know that Jesus and His gospel have a much higher place in your life than Mickey Mouse and Disney World.  Mom—you are a theologian.  More important than your “soccer mom” identity is your calling to God’s Word.  What are you teaching your children?  Use your gifts for God’s glory.  Paul David Tripp writes:

Children are God’s possession (see Ps. 127:3) for his purpose.  That means that his plan for parents is that we would be his agents in the lives of these little ones that have been formed into his image and entrusted to our care. [2]


  1. Paul David Tripp, Parenting: 14 Gospel Principles That Can Radically Change Your Family, (Wheaton: Crossway, 2016), 21.
  2. Ibid., 14.
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