Over the past two days, my wife and I have logged many miles over the cobblestone roads of Rome, Italy.  During our time in Rome, we have managed to hit all of the historic sites on our personal list—including the majestic Sistine Chapel that was in progress by Michelangelo when Martin Luther made his historic pilgrimage to Rome over 500 years ago.

Yesterday morning, we began the day at the Colosseum—one of the most famous sites of ancient Rome that still stands today as a piece of history linking modernity to antiquity.  The emperors of Rome’s history would buy and sell gladiators much like modern day football teams hire and trade athletes.  Sometimes slaves or prisoners would appear in the midst of the Colosseum too—where they would fight wild beasts including lions, tigers, leopards, and even hippopotamuses.  What a way to go, right?

Just under a half a mile from the Colosseum is the Mamertine Prison where Paul was held in chains.  The ancient dungeon prison had a stone floor, stone walls, and a stone ceiling with one way in and one way out through the small hole above that provided a bit of light to the damp and dark dungeon below.  Sometimes as many as 100 prisoners would have been kept in the small dungeon below—and everyone who was placed into that hole received a death sentence.

While being held as a prisoner in the shadow of the Colosseum, Paul would have heard loud thundering cheers from the crowds in the Colosseum numbering between 40k-70k.  Much like a loud and vibrant athletic event in modern times complete with competition, drama, and passionate fans—the whole area surrounding the Colosseum would have felt the pulsating cheers.

As Paul sat in the dark dungeon contemplating the fighting of the gladiators—he would have reflected upon his life and ministry of the gospel.

  1. Five different times Jews whipped him with 39 stripes.
  2. Three times he was beaten with rods.
  3. One time he was stoned, dragged out of the city, and forsaken as dead.
  4. Three times he suffered shipwreck. A night and a day he spend in the deep.
  5. Perils of waters – Floods or rivers as he journeyed.
  6. Perils of robbers – those who would rob him as he was on his journey.
  7. Perils by his own country men – his own people rejected him.
  8. Perils by the heathen – the lost and unregenerate wicked ones – persecuted.
  9. Perils in the city – as he would travel to the city to work or buy food.
  10. Perils in the wilderness – animals or violent people.
  11. Perils in the sea – as he was shipwrecked and faced storms on the sea.
  12. Perils among false brethren – those who claimed to be Christians.

Paul had been able to plant many churches on his missionary travels that spanned many countries, cities, and continents.  Paul had invested in others and discipled men to carry on the gospel torch.  Men like Timothy, Titus, and others were placed in strategic posts where they would oversee churches and make disciples.  Yet, at the end of his life, Paul sat in the dungeon cell listening to the ground shaking crowds in the Colosseum and he viewed his ministry of the gospel as a good fight.  Rather than a wasted fight or a vain fight—it was a good fight.  The cause was worthy and the price of imprisonment, suffering, and martyrdom joyful.  In a strange way in the eyes of the world, Paul was at peace to be aligned with Jesus Christ in his suffering.

The scars the gladiator received in his epic battles in the Colosseum could not compare to the deep wounds suffered by Paul in his missionary labors.  However, Paul was able to reflect upon his journey of faith as a good fight rather than a wasted pursuit for fame and vain success.  Paul longed to preach the gospel in Rome, and he finally was able to do so—only from a dark dungeon.  In his final letter recorded in the New Testament before he was taken from the dungeon through the hole and transported to a place in the streets of Rome where executioners cut off his head, the battle scared gospel gladiator penned these final words to Timothy—his young disciple:

I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith. [8] Henceforth there is laid up for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, will award to me on that day, and not only to me but also to all who have loved his appearing (2 Timothy 4:7-8).

Most gladiators died by the sword or weapons of other warriors in the Colosseum as a means of entertainment for the people.  Paul died in the streets as a condemned criminal.  Paul’s death had a great purpose that transcended the entertainment of the Colosseum—and for that reason we remember him to this very day unlike the warriors of the Colosseum.

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