This past week, during the G3 Conference, I was asked a question that we should not overlook too quickly.  I was asked, “What catalysts do you believe have led to the resurgence of sound biblical theology?”  That question could be answered in several different ways from a variety of different angles, but I believe one of the key factors that has led to this resurgence, especially among young people, is the boom of information technology.

The Technology of the Past

During the era of Martin Luther, there was no such thing as social media (as we know it today).  There was no Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or Pinterest.  Most written communication had to be done by hand.  However, just as the Reformation sparked in Germany, the wave of Gutenberg’s printing press had taken off and was poised to print and distribute the works of the Reformers far and wide.  As we look back at history, it’s almost like it was charted out and planned to happen that way.  As we consider the sovereignty of God and His providence that governs the world—it’s clear that God was designing the pages of history.

Not only did students of Luther have his Ninety-Five Theses printed and distributed, but following Luther’s conversion a short time later, his books would be printed and spread all across Europe.  What was not possible just a short time earlier was now driving the Reformation.  Gutenberg’s press was serving as the vehicle of the Reformation.  The flame was spreading and Gutenberg’s press was the catalyst.

The Technology of the Present

As we look at the modern resurgence of biblical theology, a high view of God, and a robust understanding of sovereign grace, in many ways the new advancements of information technology are being harnessed to spread the truth across the world.  Many hours would go into the printing of a sermon, a tract, or a book in Luther’s day.  It would be written down on paper by hand and then a printer would set the moveable type of a printing press in place, and with detailed precision, the ink would be stamped onto each page in order to compile a book.  After further advancements, the press would become more efficient, but the process still took precious time.  Then, after the printing phase ended, the distribution phase started.  There was no UPS or FedEx in those days.

Today, an author can write an article and within a few minutes, he can publish it to the entire world by pressing one single button on a blog site.  With the advancements of the printing industry, the publishing and distribution phases move at rapid pace in comparison to Luther’s day.  We have moved quickly past the radio era into a new phase of technology that allows the end user the option of not only listening live, but also prerecorded media.  What was not possible in the radio era is now possible in our video era as sermons can now be streamed through smart devices in video format.  Modern technology, in many ways, has been used as a catalyst to spread truth and teach good biblical theology.

As we consider how primitive technology was in Luther’s day and how limited we were just 50 years ago, we should praise God for the tools and advancements that are available to us now.  In many ways, our sanctification can benefit from the use of these technological advancements.  In Luther’s day they were fighting to get the Bible printed for the people in their own language.  Today, we can press a button on a screen and parse verbs in the original language with Logos Bible Software, read commentaries, and listen to sermons related to the verses we’re studying.

As we consider these modern tools and advancements, let us with glad hearts be good stewards of God’s blessings.

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